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Descendants of Sehoy I

Taken from genealogy's supplied by Dr. Marion Elisha Tarvin/Turvin, Carol Middleton, letters of Benjamin Hawkins and Thomas Woodard, and census data, this is what I have come up with for descendants of Sehoy...the Tate's, Durant's, Weatherford's, and McGillivray's.

Generation No. 1

1.  SEHOY1 I was born 1702 in Taskigi, On the Coosa River, and died 1772.  She married LOUIS MARCHAND 1720.  He was born Bef. 1700 in France, and died 1722.

Notes for SEHOY I:
Of the Wind Clan of Oticiapofa. Sehoy's native tribe was the Koasati (or Coushatta) of Hickory Ground.



Children of SEHOY and LOUIS MARCHAND are:
2.i.RED2 SHOES, b. Abt. 1720; d. Unknown.
3.ii.SEHOY MARCHAND, b. Abt. 1720; d. Unknown.


Generation No. 2

2.  RED2 SHOES (SEHOY1 I) was born Abt. 1720, and died Unknown.

Children of RED SHOES are:
4.i.DAUGHTER RED3 SHOES, b. Abt. 1750; d. Apr 1818.
ii.RED SHOES II, b. Abt. 1750; d. 1783.

Notes for RED SHOES II:
Red Shoes. Chief of the Coosadas (Koasatis / Coushattas). Uncle and mentor according to tribal tradition, of Alexander  McGillivray. Red Shoes taught Alexander the ways of the Wilderness. In his later years, he took to drink. Red Shoes  died in late 1783 or early 1784, according to a letter by Alexander McGillivray.




3.  SEHOY2 MARCHAND (SEHOY1 I) was born Abt. 1720, and died Unknown.  She married (1) CHIEF OF CREEKS.  He was born Abt. 1720, and died Unknown.  She married (2) LACHLAN MCGILLIVRAY 1734 in Wetumpka, Elmore, Ala.  He was born 1719 in Drumanglass, Inverneshire, Scotland, and died Aft. 1794 in Isle of Skye, Scotland.

Notes for LACHLAN MCGILLIVRAY:
A Scottish Trader out of Charleston, SC
From Benjamin Hawkins

From Hebert and Ball, Chapter 2, The Creek War 1813-1814

Of this whole south-eastern portion of the country a characteristic feature was, in the latter part of the eighteenth century, the residence of white traders in every large Indian town, and at points well adapted for commerce and for intrigue. At Fort Toulouse on the Coosa river, established by the French in 1714, Captain Marchand as at one time commander. He was killed there in 1722. He had taken as a wife a Muscogee or Creek maiden of the Clan of the Wind, called the most powerful clan of the Creek nation. He had a beautiful daughter called Sehoy Marchand.

There came from a wealthy home in Scotland a youth of sixteen to see the wonders of this land. His name was Lachlan McGillivray. He landed in Carolina, joined the Indian traders about 1735, saw at length the young Sehoy Marchand, "cheerful in countenance, bewitching in looks, and graceful in form," then herself about sixteen years of age, married her, some say about 1745, when he had gained some property, spent nearly fifty years as Indian trader and Georgia royalist in the American wilds, left his Indian children and his plantations, when the British left Savannah, about 1782, and returned to his native land, taking with him "a vast amount of money and movable effects." But of his Indian children, part Indian, part Scotch, part French, one, Alexander McGillivray, became noted, wealthy, and powerful. He was well educated at Charleston. He returned to the Indian country, took control of the Creek nation, received from the British the rank and pay of a British colonel in the War of the Revolution, in 1884 went to Pensacola and made a treaty with Spain as being "Emperor" of the Creeks and Seminoles, in 1790 at New York made a treaty with the American government receiving the rank of brigadier general with a salary of twelve hundred dollars a year, and afterwards was appointed by Spain Superintendent-General of the Creek nation with a salary of two thousand dollars a year which was increased in July, 1792, to thirty-five hundred. He was at the same time a member of a wealthy commercial house. He died in Pensacola February 17, 1793. One of his sisters, the beautiful and talented Sophia McGillivray, married Benjamin Durant, who was of Huguenot descent, who came from South Carolina and as early as 1786 was settled on the Alabama River. Another Indian trader, Charles Weatherford, some say from Scotland, some say from England, married a half sister of Alexander McGillivray, the daughter of a chief of pure Indian blood, who had been formerly married to Colonel Tate, at one time a British officer at Fort Toulouse. We find here therefore the names of Tate, Durant, Weatherford, and McGillivray, as members of connected families of mixed blood, talented, wealthy, influential, with whom, as individuals, in the Creek-War history we shall become further acquainted. A number of other noted border men there were who need not here be named. But one more name should not be omitted.

Children of SEHOY MARCHAND and CHIEF CREEKS are:
5.i.SEHOY3, b. 1755, Little Tulsa, Elmore, Ala; d. 1811, Montgomery Hill, Al.
ii.JEANETT, b. Abt. 1759, Little Tulsa, Elmore, Ala; d. 1812; m. LE CLERC MILFORT, Abt. 1776; b. Abt. 1752; d. Unknown.

Notes for JEANETT:
According To Thomas Woodard, she never existed...from a work written by Leclerc Milfort...is her presence, just because she is a sister doesn't mean she's a full sister..so I have put her here for now

McGillivray and I went to the town of Coetas where he was to hold a grand council. Since the opening day was not fixed, it happened that all the band chiefs had not arrived. The inhabitants gave us a feast to occupy the time until the council should open. It is necessary to note that these festivities last three days, and that the women and girls enjoy unlimited freedom at them, especially when the snake dance is performed, during which they can flirt with men and make as many advances to them as they like. It was the first time I had attended such a feast, and I was not forewarned of everything which might happen there. The women of the nation had easily noticed that I paid them little attention; and I had every reason to believe that they had planned to ascertain the causes of such indifference. They had me tempted by one of the prettiest young women in the town, a maiden, with an attractive face. The other women had clubbed together to get her a beautiful printed calico skirt, a nice chemise, silver pins, two pairs of bracelets also of silver, an enormous quantity of ribbons of all colors fastened to her hair, and five pairs of earrings which hung in graduated sizes like chains. It was in this full dress that she approached me and chose me as her partner. Compared with the others, she seemed beautiful to me, and I was easily responsive to the particular attention she was giving me. After spending some time at the festivities we agreed to meet in a most secret spot as soon as the dances were over. It was not long before she left, and I followed her to the home of her mother; when we had arrived there, she told me that she was going into her room, which was a garret; I got ready to follow her; but the stairs which led up to it were such a wretched ladder, that I was somewhat fearful that it would break under my weight. I climbed up however, and I had no sooner arrived, when I felt myself seized by four persons, which astonished me a great deal in this place where I thought I was alone. I saw four women who chided me very gayly for my moderation, and told me that they had not yet seen a capon-warrior, and that I would not get away from them without their being convinced of the contrary. Although I had just gotten up from the table and my senses were somewhat excited by the good food, and the enticement of the young girl, however the assault appeared to me hard to sustain. Nevertheless, I had to prove to these women that a French warrior is well worth a Creek warrior. I came out of the combat with honor, and my adventure was soon generally known.

After the holding of the council, I came back with McGillivray. He said to me on the way: "I thought you had an insurmountable dislike for the women of this nation, to whom I myself had a great deal of difficulty getting accustomed; but your adventure at Coetas gives me proof of the contrary. The friendship which binds us together makes it possible for me to propose to you to marry my sister; she knows the English language and that of the savages, and thus will be able, to be sometimes of assistance to you, and serve as an interpreter for you."

I had too much affection for McGillivray, and gratitude for what he had done in my behalf, to refuse an offer which was an additional proof of the interest he took in me. I answered him that I felt very flattered by the preference that he was good enough to give me, and that if I were as agreeable to his sister as I was to him, there would be no objection on my part. Just a few days after our return, I did in fact become his brother-in-law. This marriage was the final step to my winning the general esteem and confidence of the nation, in the midst of which I lived very happily for twenty years.

At present I am only awaiting, as I have said in the first part of this book, orders from the French government to return among those savages whose honesty and sincerity suit my character perfectly

Marion Elijah Tarvin's account...
Gen. LeClere Milford, an intelligent Frenchman, mentioned above, lived in the Creek Nation from 1776 to 1796. He wrote a history of the Muscogees or Creeks, and published his work in Paris in 1802. He married Jeannet, the other sister of Gen. McGillivray of the Creek tribe. When he arrived in France with his wife; Bonaparte, who had heard of this adventureus man, honored him with an audience; he wished to engage the services of this man to help form an alliance with Alabama and.Mississippi, to strengthen his Louisiana possessions, so he made him a General of Brigade. In 1814 LeClere Milford died at his home at Rheims. His wife survived him but a short time.


Notes for LE CLERC MILFORT:
apparently left no heirs


Children of SEHOY MARCHAND and LACHLAN MCGILLIVRAY are:
iii.ELIZABETH3 MCGILLIVRAY, b. 1744; d. Unknown.

Notes for ELIZABETH MCGILLIVRAY:
Unclear as to source.

6.iv.SOPHIA MCGILLIVRAY, b. 1747; d. Unknown.
7.v.ALEXANDER MCGILLIVRAY, b. 15 Dec 1750; d. 17 Feb 1793.


Generation No. 3

4.  DAUGHTER RED3 SHOES (RED2, SEHOY1 I) was born Abt. 1750, and died Apr 1818.  She married DAVID FRANCIS.  He was born Abt. 1750, and died Unknown.

Child of DAUGHTER SHOES and DAVID FRANCIS is:
i.JOSHIA4 FRANCIS, b. Abt. 1775; d. Unknown; m. HANNAH MONIAC; b. Abt. 1769; d. Unknown.

Notes for HANNAH MONIAC:
NOT FOUND

I still think this is an erroneous misreading of the brother in law Josiah Francis...it is interpreted as brother in law of William Weatherford, and not Samuel Moniac, who was also present. I suspect Hannah is not a Sehoy decendant


5.  SEHOY3 (SEHOY2 MARCHAND, SEHOY1 I) was born 1755 in Little Tulsa, Elmore, Ala, and died 1811 in Montgomery Hill, Al.  She married (1) WILLIAM DIXON MONIAC Abt. 1768.  He was born Abt. 1735, and died 1846.  She married (2) JOHN TATE Abt. 1774.  He was born Abt. 1740, and died Unknown.  She married (3) CHARLES WEATHERFORD Abt. 1778.  He was born Abt. 1740, and died Abt. 1806.

Notes for WILLIAM DIXON MONIAC:
Volume 2, No. 4
Alabama Historical Reporter
March 1884

(note: some of this is repetitive)

Among the names of prominent white men who mingled their bl;ood with that of the Red man, is the same of Wm. Moniac ( a Hollander) who came with a remnant of Natchez Indians to the Creek nation in 1756. He took a Tuskegee woman, Polly Colbert, for his wife, who was the mother of Sam Moniac, who married Weatherford's sister. He and Sam Moniac were men of fine sense and indominable courage, strict integrity and enterprise, had condierable influence over the Indians, went with Gen. McGillivray to New York to see Washington, was presented by Washington with a medal, which was buried with him at Pass Christian in 1837. He was the father of Maj. David Moniac who was killed in the Florida war in 1836, and of whom Gen. Jessup said, that he was as brave and gallant a man as ever dnew a sword or faced in enemy. He (David Moniac) was a nephew of Weatherford and David Tate, and a graduate of West Point. His descendants are highly respected citizens pf Ala. and Miss. His wife was a cousin of Oscelola the Florida chief, who commanded the Florida Indians when Maj. Moniac was killed. Moniac had resigned his commission in the U. S. A. many years before the Florida war of 1836, and entered the army as a private in the company from Claiborne, Ala., but soon rose to the rank of Major by Brevet, and was in command of 600 Creeks and Choctaws when he was killed. His mother was Weatherford's siter, which would lead to the conclusion taht Weatherford sprang from heroic stock, and his uncle, Gen. McGillivray was said by Judge John R.? Campbell to be a regular descendant of a noble Scotch family of a heroic clan in Scotland.

William Moniac, a Hollander, the father of Sam married Polly Colbert, a Tuskegee woman who was the mother of Sam Moniac, who married Elizabeth Weatherford. He went to New York with Alexander McGillivray; he was presented by Washington with a medal which was buried with him at Pass Christian in 1837; they had three children; David, Alexander, and Levitia; David Moniac under the treaty of New York was graduated at West Point. He was a Major and commanded 600 Creeks and Choctaws against the Seminoles in the Florida War of 1836. He was killed, 13 bullets piercing his body. A braver man never lived. Levitia or Vicey married William Sizemore of Baldwin County, Alabama who was a son of Dixon Bailey's sister, a mixture of Creek and white blood. He became a wealthy planter on the Alabama River, and has many descendants. Major David Moniac married Miss Polly Powell (or Mrs. Saunders) and had two children; David Alexander and Margaret. David Alexander was Sheriff of Baldwin County, Alabma and served one of two terms. He died in 1880. Margaret married S. J. McDonald and had several children.

Elizabeth married Samuel Moniac, who was son of Willliam Moniac, mentioned above. There were three children by this marriage, named as follows: David, Alexander, and Levitia. David was the Major Moniac who was killed in the Florida war in 1836. The Grand-mother of Major David Moniac was the daughter of the Creek Chief William Colbert, from whom the Colbert Shoals, on the Tennessee river, took its name





Notes for CHARLES WEATHERFORD:
who are Permelia Weatherford married to James Couch and Rosannah Weatherford married to Isaac Daniel in Monroe in 1836? supposedly the neices of William Weatherford


this is Marion Elijah Tarvin's account...

Sehoy Tate, the sister of Gen. McGillivray, after the death of her husband in 1779, married Chas. Weatherford, an Englishman who came to the Creek Nation some years prior to 1778, from Georgia. He was a man of means and was a government contractor, and constructed and owned the first race courses in Ala. From this marriage they.had five children; three sons and two daughters, namely: William (the warrior), John, Elizabeth, Washington and Rosannah. The Sehoy the second, sister of Alex. McGillivray, was an extraordinary woman, if only from the fact of being the mother of three very remarkable personages; David Tate (the writers grand-father), William the Chief, and Rosannah Weatherford.
Rosannah married Capt. Shomo, a gallant officer of the U. S. Navy. I well recollet Aunt Rosannah and Capt. Shomo, having often been at their house. She was woman of great force of of character. She was born in the upper part of Baldwin county, Ala., near where rests the remains of her warrior brother, William the "Red Eagle". From this marriage they had five children: David, Joseph W., both, of whom were eminent physicians of Monroe and Wilcox counties, Ala., James, Frank, Virginia, William, and Fannie. Virginia now lives with her brother, Dr. Jos. W. Shomo. Dr. J. W. Shomo was twice married. His first wife was Miss Mary Wheadon, of Virginia. They had two daughters--Mr. Dr. Scott, the other, Mrs. Kingall of Monroe County, Ala.,



Child of SEHOY and WILLIAM MONIAC is:
i.HANNAH4 MONIAC, b. Abt. 1769; d. Unknown; m. JOSHIA FRANCIS; b. Abt. 1775; d. Unknown.

Notes for HANNAH MONIAC:
NOT FOUND

I still think this is an erroneous misreading of the brother in law Josiah Francis...it is interpreted as brother in law of William Weatherford, and not Samuel Moniac, who was also present. I suspect Hannah is not a Sehoy decendant


Child of SEHOY and JOHN TATE is:
8.ii.DAVID4 TATE, b. Abt. 1775; d. 1829.


Children of SEHOY and CHARLES WEATHERFORD are:
9.iii.ELIZABETH4 WEATHERFORD, b. Abt. 1779, Creek Nation; d. Unknown.
10.iv.JOHN DAVID WEATHERFORD, b. Bet. 1780 - 1790; d. Abt. 1831.
11.v.WILLAIM WEATHERFORD, b. 1781, Alabama; d. 24 Mar 1824.
vi.WASHINGTON WEATHERFORD, b. Aft. 1782; d. Unknown.

Notes for WASHINGTON WEATHERFORD:
I have found no record of him, he must have died before David Tate

12.vii.ALEXANDER WEATHERFORD, b. Abt. 1798; d. Unknown.
13.viii.ROSANNAH WEATHERFORD, b. Abt. 1805; d. Aft. 1850.


6.  SOPHIA3 MCGILLIVRAY (SEHOY2 MARCHAND, SEHOY1 I) was born 1747, and died Unknown.  She married BENJAMIN DURANT Abt. 1770.  He was born Abt. 1750, and died Unknown.

Notes for SOPHIA MCGILLIVRAY:
Sophia was said to be about 1/2 Creek Indian.  The following was taken from
Chronicles of Oklahoma, Vol. VII, No. 1, p. 117:
"Among these people dwelt Sophia McGuillivray Durant, the wife of Benjamin Durant,
a man of Huguenot descent, and the beautiful sister of Alexander McGuillivray, the
Creek Chief.  She had an air of authority that surpassed that of her brother, and she
was much more familiar with the Creek language owing to his having spent so many
years out of the Creek Nation; on many occasions when he held councils in the
vicinity of her home, she would deliver his speeches much to the interest of the
chiefs who listened with pleasure.  During McGuillivray's stay in New York, the
Creeks started an uprising on a settlement in which they threatened to put the
inhabitants to death.  Mrs. Durant, with characteristic McGuillivray boldness, with
her Negro maid, mounted horses and rode three days, camping out at night, to the
Hickory Ground, assembled the chiefs, and holding over them the vengeance of
her brother she forced the arrest of the leaders and thus ended what would have
been a bloody project.  This remarkable woman gave birth to twins two weeks later
at Hickory Ground."
Sophia lived on the Savannah with her father until he left the Southland after the
Revolutionary War.  Then She went into the Creek Indian Nation. Hickory Ground
(or Indian name Otciapofa) was located on the Coosa River near Wetumpka in what
is now Elmore County, AL.  The farm at Durant's Bend on the Alabama River was
cultivated by Benjamin Durant as early as 1786.  A Durant relative relative, Hellen
Durant Sharp still lives on the Durant land in AL.


Sophia was sent to school in Savannah, GA under the care of her father's cousin
Rev. Farquhar McGuillivray.  But she got homesick and returned home.  She was
taught hunting skills by her uncle Red Shoes.  She was trained to be a leader of her
people.  She often translated for her brother Alexander at tribal meetings.  After she
married,  she and Ben lived at Vale Royale until her father was sent back to Scotland.
Then they returned to AL and lived at Durant's Bend.

Thomas Woodard's remininsces...
The next is Ben or Peter Durant — he was called by both names — who was a South Carolinian of French origin. He came to the Nation and married Sophia McGillivray, sister of Alexander. They raised three sons, Laughlin, John and Sandy. Laughlin married a Miss Hall, who was born and raised at or near the Cow-ford on St. Johns river, East Florida, where Jacksonville is now. John and Sandy went off with Peter McQueen to Florida. After the old Creek war, Sandy died at Tampa Bay; John went to the Island of New Providence. Laughlin Durant raised several children. His daughter, Sarah, brought up pretty much by Davy White in Mobile, married Sam Adams, who once run a line of stages from Vera Cruz to the city of Mexico, and afterwards run a line through the Creek Nation, and was with .Jim Greene the night he was killed and the first stages were burned.

The daughters of Ben Durant were Rachel, who married Billy McGirth, a son of Daniel McGirth, of revolutionary memory; they raised one son, named Billy. After McGirth's death, she married Davy Walker, and raised two sons, Davy and Ben; after Walker died, she married a man by the name of Bershins, and was living among the Choctaws the last I knew of her. Polly, the second daughter, married a full blooded Tallassee, named Cochirny, and lived like all other Indians. Sophia married a Dr. Macomes; Betsy married Peter McQueen, which I have already mentioned

Marion elijah Tarvin's account...

Sophia, sister to Gen. McGillivray, was beautiful in every respect, she had an air of authority, and had great influence for good. She married Ben Durant of S. C., a Frenchman, at Little Tulsa, in 1779, on the Coosa River, Ala. They afterwards went to live on one of her father's plantations on the Savannah River. They had, by this marriage, five children: Lachlan, Sophia, Polly, Rachel, and Betsey. One of the children married James Baily who was killed at Ft. Mims; he was a brother of Capt. Dixon Baily who fought, so bravely in defence of Ft. Mims and was killed. Sophia married Dr. McCombs a Scotchman. Lachlan married Miss Polly Hall of Baldwin, County, Ala. and had five sons: Jack, Charles, Martin, William and Constance, and Sally Adams. Jack lives at Bartlett, Williamson Co., Texas. He is now 83 years of ago and a prominent citizen, and has several children. One of his sons, Arthur, lives at Abilene, Texas. One of his daughters, Milly, married Mark Minter, and has six sons. They live at Muscogee, I. T. Charles was a soldier in the Mexican war, under Gen. Taylor. Martin was twice sheriff of Baldwin county, Ala. William was engaged by the U. S. Government, with Ex-chief Ward Coachman, in carrying the last body of 65 Creeks from Alabama to the Nation in 1849. I was present and saw them get on board a steamboat at Sizemoore's wood-yard. Polly married Muslushobie (otherwise Coachman), who was half white, and of the Ala., tribe. They had one son, Ward Coachman, a well-educated and very popular man of the present Creek Nation. He was twice elected chief or governor of his Nation and is now a member of the Council. He lived in Alabama at the house of his uncle, Lachlan Durant, until he was twenty-two years of age, when he moved to the Territory. He has been married twice, and has four children: Peter, Vicey, Charles and George. Constance Durant still lives in Baldwin, co., ala., an old bachelor. Neither William or Charles were ever married. I was often at the home of Lachlan Durant, during my boyhood, and heard him talk of his uncle Alexander McGillivray. Martin Durant married a Miss Hannah Pollard, and had several children,.the eldest named Norman.


Notes for BENJAMIN DURANT:
To date, no one knows from whence Ben came or who his parents were.  But it is
thought that he is connected to the Durants of S.C.  Ben had a brother named
William L. who lived in or near Montgomery Co., AL.  Info on this family was found
on WFT CD Vol 5, in Pedigree #3729

In SC Ben is registered as being the best boxer around.
It is said that he came to the Creek Indian Nation to challenge an Indian to a fight.
He won and with it he also won Sophia's hand.

Benjamin was said to have Creek Indian blood. Some say he was a full blood and others say 1/2 blood. It is believed that the Durants came from North Carolina.  Benjamin had a brother named William L. Durant who lived in or near Montgomery County, Alabama. Info on this family was found in WFT CD Vol.#5, in Pedigree #3729, submitted by Nell Peterson, 8010 Parkdale Drive, Austin, TX 78757-8132.
    In data that I received from Professor Woodrow W. Wallace, was a copy of a letter written by Arturo O'Neill, dated October 19, 1783, who was in the Creek Indian Nation in what is now Alabama. (copy in the Durant file) This letter mentions Alexander McGillivray and also his sister Sophia who according to the letter " was married to an Indian half-breed named Duran, (Durant) whose father was French". This letter was addressed to Josef de Ezpeleta, Captain General of Spanish Forces in Havana, Cuba.

Killed in the Fort Mims Massacre

Children of SOPHIA MCGILLIVRAY and BENJAMIN DURANT are:
14.i.LACHLAN4 DURANT, b. Abt. 1765, Little Tallassie, Creek Indian Nation (now Alabama); d. Abt. 1853, bur. Bromley Community near Bay Minette, AL..
ii.JOHN DURANT, b. Abt. 1767; d. Unknown.
15.iii.SOPHIA DURANT, b. Abt. 1767; d. Aft. 1831.
16.iv.ELIZABETH DURANT, b. Abt. 1770, Creek Indian Nation, AL; d. Bef. Feb 1835, Macon Co., AL.
17.v.RACHEL DURANT, b. Abt. 1770, Durants Bend, Creek Indian Nation in Alabama; d. Aft. 1835, Alabama.
18.vi.MARY DURANT, b. Abt. 1774; d. Abt. 1836, Steamboat in route to indian territory.
vii.NANCY DURANT, b. Abt. 1780; d. 1812.

Notes for NANCY DURANT:
May have been married to a Pounds, and James Bailey. Killed at Fort Mims massacre

viii.ALEXANDER DURANT, b. Abt. 1792; d. Unknown.
ix.LOUISA DURANT, b. Abt. 1792; d. Aft. 1835.

Notes for LOUISA DURANT:
Louisa Durant. Married 1st-Sefroy D'Olive. Married 2nd-William Jones. Louisa died after 1835 in Tallapoosa Co., AL


7.  ALEXANDER3 MCGILLIVRAY (SEHOY2 MARCHAND, SEHOY1 I) was born 15 Dec 1750, and died 17 Feb 1793.  He married (1) ELSIE JANIE MONIAC, daughter of WILLIAM MONIAC and UNKNOWN CREEK.  She was born Aft. 1760, and died Bef. 1793.  He married (2) VICEY CORNELLS.  She was born Abt. 1780, and died Unknown.

Notes for ALEXANDER MCGILLIVRAY:
Panton to Lachlan McGillivray, April 10, 1794
Printed in Pickett, "History of Oklahoma, 430-31, from a document found in the papers of the District Court at New Orleans.

1794, April 10 Pensacola

.... Your son, sir, was a man that I esteemed greatly. I was perfectly convinced that our regard for each other was mutual. It so happened that we had an interest in serving each other, which first brought us together, and the longer we were acquainted, the stronger our friendship.

I found him deserted by the British, without pay, wothout money, without friends, and withouit property, saving a few negroes, and he and his nation threatened with destruction by the Georgians, unless they agreed to cede them the better part of their country. I had the good fortune to point out a mode by which he could save them all, and it succeeded beyond expectation.

... He died on the 17th February, 1793, of complicated disorders -- inflamed lungs and the gout on his stomach. He was taken ill on the path coming from his cow-pen on Little River, where one of his wives, Joseph Cornell's daughter, resided, and died eight days after his arrival here. No pains, no attention, no cost was spared to save the life of my friend. But fate would have it otherwise, and he breathed his last in my arms.

.... He died possessed of sixty negroes, three hundred head of cattle, with a large stock of horses.

.... I advised, I supported, I pushed him on, to be the great man. Spaniards and Americans felt his weight, and this enabled him to haul me after him, so as to establish this house with more solid privileges than, without him, I should have attained. This being the case, if he had lived, I meant besides, what he was owing me, to have added considerably to his stock of negroes. What I intended to do for the father, I will do for his children. Thos ought not to operate against your making that ample provision for your grandson, and his two sisters, which you have it in your power to make. They have lately lost their mother, so that they have no friends, poor things, but you and me. My heart bleeds for them, and what I can I will do. The boy, Aleck*, is old enough to be sent to Scotland to school, which I intend to do next year, and then you will see him

* There are a few letters in the Panton papers that mention Aleck's schooling at Banff. John Innerarity of London acted as his guardian; Innerarity wrote to Wm. Panton in 1798, about Aleck, "he bids fair to make a good scholar and what is better a good man." Four years later John Leslie wrote to Forbes that "poor Aleck McGillivray labours under a consumption, " and that the doctor gave the young man only three months to live. (Florida Historical Society Quarterly, XIV, 116-19)





Notes for VICEY CORNELLS:
Vicey Cornells, the second daughter of Joe Cornells, married Alexander McGillivray; and after he died, she married Zach McGirth, and raised several daughters--one married Vardy Jolly, one Ned James, one Aleck Moniac, one Bill Crabtree, and the youngest, Sarah, went to Arkansas

Children of ALEXANDER MCGILLIVRAY and ELSIE MONIAC are:
i.ALEXANDER4 MCGILLVARY, JR., b. Abt. 1780; d. Abt. 1802.
19.ii.MARGARET MCGILLIVARY, b. Abt. 1782; d. Bef. 1828.
iii.DAUGHTER MCGILLIVARY, b. Abt. 1784; d. Unknown.


Generation No. 4

8.  DAVID4 TATE (SEHOY3, SEHOY2 MARCHAND, SEHOY1 I) was born Abt. 1775, and died 1829.  He married (1) MARY RANDON 1800, daughter of JOHN RANDON and ROSEANNA HOLMES.  She was born Abt. 1783, and died 1813 in Fort Mims.  He married (2) PENNY COLEMAN 1814.  She was born Abt. 1790, and died Bef. 1817.  He married (3) MARGARET DYER 1819 in Baldwin County, AL, daughter of REUBEN DYER and MARIA CUPINS.  She was born Abt. 1793, and died 1851.

Notes for DAVID TATE:
According to Thomas Woodward, Tate was only about 10 years younger than Alexander McGillivray

This file is copyrighted and contributed by:
Ruth Newlan
<ruthann@saw.net>
====================================================================
March 2003


Hired Browns negroes to Frasie for 8 mo. paid to me minuted on 'Book' hire
of my own boys unsettled bring Littell to settlement
Capt Austin present
4 years no settlement books will show all my groceries? lately from him. 
If he does anything fair he will leave me but very little as to Browns
children let every cent be obtained
Gen. Parsons will do the best he can
for my estate.
I wish it divided as soon as possible before next crop
except stock do the best it is possible for my daughter Louisa

You know
how I wish my property arranged: do it if you can four or five for Elizabeth
in the will .
David & Mr. Vaughn can settle by my book's notes held by Mr.
Booth against Mr. Vaughn are to be taken uup by Mr Tate to take up the
first note
to John Weatherford my Brother.  I will a negro boy and my gun

I wish the provision made yesterday for my wife and youngest daughter
to remain so and the properly brought to me by my wife to be given to her
own children wherein I do think proper old auntie and a little boy Wallace
and Tod and Mary who is with Capt Shomo & Jack Seal and Handy at Mr Tate
death those under age to receive their freedom at 21 years  Wallace Tod
& Mary and Auntie to be free as soon as possible
Take Flora home Mrs Tate
when all is over Mrs. Shomo to keep Mary as long as she wants to David
Moniac one of my Executors I wish him to be mighty cautious always to go Mr.
McLoskey
I want my debts paid go with the crop to Mobile and receive the
money be wide awake for every body my wife knows  I have talked enough with
her
I wish the bill of sales which I hold to certain negroes belonging
to my Brother John Weatherford to be destroyed  I want to do nothing
dishonest.
I wish my patent gold watch to hang up in the house as a time
piece for my wife always maybe Tarvin may contend it is not a fair division
of my property
  I contend that it is  I want the rest to be equally divided. 
The Dyer claim goes to Mrs. Tate and her children now cultivated by Capt Shomo.
Mrs. Tate will keep sufficent horses and mules to hunt the stock and tend her
plantation it is not my wish that any of them should be advertised for sale. 

Mr Hollinger is to sign a bond on demand for the land on the other side of
the river thirty five Hundred dollars to be paid for it 2000 dollars already
paid  Mr Hollinger to wait for the balc. the land on the other side to be left
to Mrs Tate and her youngest daughter
To Lynn McGee I wish to will him 400
head of cattle, if he gets off to himself but I hope he will always live
with Mrs. Tate and she will not let him suffer a moment
To David Moniac I
give three or four negroes and fifty cows and calves & 25 steers.  I wish
him always to be with his aunt and she will give him something again
old
Will and Rose I wish to be free at the same time with Handy

the land on this
side the river to be disposed of to the best advantage among them
  Elisha
Tarvin to retain the family of negroes now in his possession  Mr. Tarvin &
my wife to run the mill until sold  I was to give William Mills 350 Dolls.
to build the mill  I told him as he was unfortunate I would allow something
more.  I want my Executor Gen. Parsons to pay what Mechanics my say. 
I think 100 dolls. enough.

Above all things my Executor Gen Parsons to get rid of Innerearity suit as
soon as possible.  Borrowed of Davy Lucas 95 dollars gave an order to Mills
for 30 dolls on Davy.  Indian John always has a home he has some Heifers
I gave him he will keep with the cattle till the stock is sold two fillies
for my daughter Josephine

  17th day of Nov. 1829


Marion Elijah Tarvin's account...
The same year he returned from Scotland he married Miss Mary Randon, both of Baldwin Co., Alabama. She was a French and Creek blood; the fruits of this marriage were three daughters: Louisa,.Elizabeth and Theresa.
Louisa married George Tunstall, brother of Col. Thomas Tunstall, who was Secretary of State during Gov, A.P. Bagby's administration of Alabama. From this marriage they had eight children; Thos. Tate, Mary Ann, Peyton Randolph, Lucy, Elizabeth, Rebecca, Geo. Washington and Edmund. Thos. Tate was appointed U.S. Consul to Dadiz, Spain, in 1856, returning to Ala. in 1865. In1888 he was appointed Consul to San Salvador by President Grover Cleveland, and removed by President Harrison. He was educated at The University of N. C. and speaks several languages. He resides at Mobile and married a Miss Crossland and has two sons. Mary Ann married Dr. Wm. I. Tunstall and had four children: Laura, Percy, Thomas and Arthur. Lucy married Alex. Lumsden, a nephew of Frank Lumsden, formerly editor of the N. 0. Picayune and he had several children: One son, Capt. Frank Lumsden of Mobile, who married a daughter of Gen. Can Dorm; Peyton Randolph married Miss Laura Slaughter and had four sons: Peyton and Thomas (both dentists of Mobile) and Edmund and Clay. Rebecca married William Hobbes; they had one daughter, Willie, now Mrs. Neville of Mobile. Elizabeth married Jno. D. Weatherford of Monroe County (a nephew of Wm. Weatherford the warrior), and had several children. The writer was at her wedding which was a brilliant affair.

Elizabeth Tate married Elijah Tarvin, they had seven children, two now living in the Creek Nation, Geo. W. and Eliza Douglas.
Theresa Tate married Elisah Tarvin on the 26th of Dec. 1825 (he was a brother of Elijah); they had eight children: William, Virginia, Elizabeth, Richard Maiden, Marion Elisah (the writer), Victoria, Miller Tate, Edger James all born in Baldwin County, Ala. Elizabeth married Wm. H. Steadham and had three children: James Emanuel, Elisah and Rosa. Marion Elisah married Miss Sophia Frances, youngest daughter of Pleasant White of Sumpter County, Ala., and had two sons: Pleasant Floyd, and Beauregard Coats. John Coats, the grandfather of Sophia Frances White, (now Mrs. Marion E. Tarvin), moved from S. C. to Alabama at an early day and settled in Green County, representing that district in the State senate several terms. Victoria married Frank Lawson and had two daughters: Fannie and Josephine, now Mrs. Brown of Choctaw County, Ala. Marion Elisah (the writer) finished his literary studies under the Beal brothers, at Wilkens' Academy in Maury County, Tennessee, after which he studied medicine and dentistry and was graduated from Baltimore College of Dental surgery in 1867. He was 2nd Lt. in the 40th Ala. volunteer regiment, Holtzclaw's Brigade, Withers' Division, Polk's corps Confederate army. Miller Tate Tarvin was a confederate soldier in the 3rd Ala. Cavalry Ruffidragooms, F. Y. Gaines Capt., and escort Company to Gen. A. S. Johnston. He was on the battlefield when Gen. Johnston was killed, Miller came to a tragic end by being waylaid and killed by a cowardly assassin. Edgar James was a confederate soldier in the 40th Ala. Vol. regiment.


Notes for MARGARET DYER:
two Margaret Tates in 1830, one in Baldwin 30-40, one daughter under 5, two 10-15, and  a male 5-10, 10-15, and 15-20, neighbor's David Moniac and lachlan Durant, the other is a free black woman it looks like in Clarke

1850 living with daughter, age is listed as 57

The submitter has given permission to the USGenWeb Project Archives to
store this file permanently for free access.

This file is copyrighted and contributed by:
Ruth Newlan
<ruthann@saw.net>
====================================================================
March 2003

Will of Margaret Tate, Baldwin, Alabama

In the name of God Amen.
I Margaret Tate of the county of Baldwin and State of Alabama being sound in mind but
not in body and feeling the uncertainty of life do hereby revoking all others make this
my last will and testament.
Imprimis.
I commend my soul to God trusting in the merits of my savior for my salvation in the
world to come.
2nd 
I commend my body to christian burial.

3rd 
To the heirs of my beloved daughter Mary D. Saunders, I give and bequeath one negro
man Sam, one negro woman Maria, one negro girl Amy, one negro boy Sam, one negro
boy Daniel, one negro girl Perry, one negro boy Harry and all my swamp cattle to her
heirs forever and it is hereby understood and intended that the aforesaid Mary D.
Saunders shall have the right and privilege of rising and enjoying all the immunities
appurtenances, advantages and privileges which are and may arise from said property
so long as she may live.

4th 
To my beloved daughter Margaret Staples and her heirs, I give and bequeath one negro
man named Job, one negro girl named Silva, and child, and it is hereby understood that
the aforesaid Margaret Staples is to take the above named negroes at a fair value
to satisfy a note that Mr. Jason Staples holds against me, after the note is satisfied
the balance is to go as part of her share of my estate.  I also give and bequeath
one negro woman named Betsy and her child named Jonab, one negro boy named Sandy, one
negro boy named Twine, one negro boy named Tobe, one negro girl named Malissa, and her
two children, one negro man named Ned, one negro boy named Harry, one negro girl
named Patience to her and her heirs forever.

5th 
To the children of my beloved son William T. Powell, I give and bequeath one negro
man named William one negro man named Aaron, one negro man named Cuff, one negro boy
named Stephen, one negro woman Elonisa, and her four children Siky, Daphney, Chloe and
Tab, one negro woman named Pop~ 
My plantation situated and described as follows: The South East fraction quarter of
section nineteen, in Township four of range three east containing one Hundred & fifty
acres and sixty five hundredths of an acre.  The west half of the northwest quarter
of section nineteen, in township four range three east, containing eighty acres. 
The east subdivision of the west fraction of the north half, west of the Alabama
River of section nineteen in Township four of range three east containing one hundred
and fifty two acres one wagon, one ox cart and four oxen, all of my Hogs, all the
farming utensils, five of my best mules.  Eighty acres of pine land situated and
described as follows.  Township four range three east the north east quarter of the
south west quarter of section thirty four, four large steers suitable for Oxen, all of
the corn & fodder now on my Plantation, and it is hereby understood and intended that
the aforesaid William T. Powell shall have the right and privilege of using and
enjoying all the immunities appurtenances, advantages and privileges which are and
may arise from said property so long as he may live but he the said William T. Powell
shall not sell, give, grant or convey or dispose of any of said property under
any pretence whatever.

6th 
To my beloved daughter Josephine B. Dreisback and her heirs.  I give and bequeath one
negro man named Dick, one negro woman Bella, and her four children named Pheobe,
Hardy, Dick and Mary, one negro girl named Rose, one negro woman named Amy and her
three children named Tina, Milly, and Fanny, one negro woman named Flora, one old negro
man named Jonah, it is my wish the old man named Jonah shall do no hard work.  I wish
my daughter Josephine to have my watch and all of my household furniture, my Carriage
and old Horse to her and her heirs forever.

7th 
To my beloved Grand daughter Mary Staples, I give and bequeath, one negro woman
named Clander and three of her children named Alex, Philip and Dilsy to her and her
heirs forever.

8th 
To my beloved Grand daughter Josephine Staples I give and bequeath one negro boy named
Or to her and her heirs forever.

9th 
To my beloved Grand Son Robert Powell, I give and bequeath one Roan Mare to him and
his heirs forever.

10th 
It is my request that Hardy and his wife, Pheobe shall be set at liberty.  I do not
wish them to be slaves after my death.  I wish them moved over to the place I purchased
from Thomas Saunders.  I do not wish that place sold under any consideration what
ever.  I wish him to have four cows and calves, and the two steers he is breaking for
oxen at this time.  I wish my son or Mr. Dreisback to act as his agent during life.

11th 
And it hereby understood and intended that my daughter Mary D. Saunders, have the right
and privileges of using and cultivating one hundred acres of my plantation land which
I have given to my son William T. Powell, the land which I wish her to have to right
of using and cultivating lays above the Gin House, after the death of the said Mary
D. Saunders, the land shall revert to the children of my son William T. Powell.

12th 
And I also give and bequeath to the said Mary D. Saunders thirty head of sheep.


13th 
I request that my stock of cattle one wagon and what mules may be left after my son
gets his number out to be sold to the highest bidder the proceeds of which I wish
applied to the payments of my debts any amount that may be left from the above sale
after my debts are paid I wish it to be given to Mrs. Rosanah Shomo.

14th 
I do hereby appoint my son in law J. D. Dreisback my executor and administrator to
settle up my estate.

15th 
It is my wish that my old negro woman Siky shall remain with my daughter Josephine
during her life.  In testimony whereof I this day set my hand and seal this the
twenty eighth day of Nov in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and fifty.
Witnesses
J. W. ShomoMargaret Tate (her mark)  (seal)
J. D. Weatherford


State of Alabama
Baldwin County}Personally appeared before me Patrick Byrne Judge of the Probate Court
of Baldwin County & State aforesaid J. D. Weatherford one of the subscribing witnesses
to the foregoing Instrument of writing and states on oath that he was requested to sign
and was present at the signing of the Instrument of writing by J. W. Shomo a
subscribing witness and that Margaret Tate acknowledged the same to be her
last Will and Testament and that the said Margaret Tate was in sound mind & memory

Subscribed & sworn to
before me this 27th day of }J. D. Weatherford
March A. D. 1851}
Patrick Byrne
Judge Probate

Admitted to Probate 27th March A. D. 1851
Patrick Byrne, Judge

Children of DAVID TATE and MARY RANDON are:
i.LOUISA MATILDA5 TATE, b. 28 Jan 1802; d. 09 May 1875, Mobile, Al.

Notes for LOUISA MATILDA TATE:
? can't find her...who did she marry?

ii.ELIZABETH TATE, b. 1804, Baldwin Co., AL; d. Aft. 1850; m. (1) ELIJAH TARVIN, 17 Oct 1827; b. Bet. 1770 - 1780; d. Bet. 1845 - 1850; m. (2) JOHN MCPATRICK, 15 Apr 1849, Baldwin County, AL; b. Abt. 1817; d. Aft. 1850.

Notes for ELIJAH TARVIN:
has a male 30-40 in household, this is the right age for Richard Turvin, son of Jeptha

iii.THERESA TATE, b. Abt. 1805; d. Bet. 1845 - 1848; m. ELISHA TARVIN, Abt. 1834; b. Bet. 1790 - 1800, Baldwin Co., AL; d. Aft. 1850.

Notes for ELISHA TARVIN:
1830 has a male 30-40 and one male under 5 and one female under 5 in household, wife is 20-30


Child of DAVID TATE and MARGARET DYER is:
iv.JOSEPHINE BONAPART5 TATE, b. Feb 1828; d. Aft. 1900; m. JOSEPH D. DRIESBACH, 1844; b. Abt. 1828; d. Unknown.

Notes for JOSEPHINE BONAPART TATE:
1900 census baldwin co, 14 children 12 living


9.  ELIZABETH4 WEATHERFORD (SEHOY3, SEHOY2 MARCHAND, SEHOY1 I) was born Abt. 1779 in Creek Nation, and died Unknown.  She married SAMUEL MONIAC 1792 in Creek Nation, , Alabama, son of WILLIAM MONIAC and POLLY COLBERT.  He was born 1781 in Creek Nation, and died 21 Aug 1837 in Creek Nation.

Notes for ELIZABETH WEATHERFORD:
not found in 1850

Notes for SAMUEL MONIAC:
1816 MOnroe county
killed in battle at Pass Christian, names his son Alex as nearest relative
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~texlance/serialset/doc55b.htm
1840 I do find a Samuel Moniac in Conecuh, born 1800-1810

Children of ELIZABETH WEATHERFORD and SAMUEL MONIAC are:
i.ALEXANDER DIXON5 MONIAC, b. Bef. 1797, Creek Nation; d. 1835; m. ELIZABETH ELLIOT; b. Bef. 1797; d. 1846.

Notes for ELIZABETH ELLIOT:
1840 Conecuh Betsy Moniac

ii.DAVID TATE MONIAC, b. 1802, Creek Nation; d. 21 Nov 1836, florida; m. MARY D. POWELL, 16 Sep 1828; b. Abt. 1810, Baldwin Co., AL; d. Unknown.

Notes for DAVID TATE MONIAC:
? left something in the will by David Tate

Notes for MARY D. POWELL:
has a Margaret and David Moniac in household in 1850 Baldwin...? her childrenMargaret is 20, David 18

I know Mary D. Saunder's is daughter of Margaret Dyer, I don't know if Mary D. Saunder's is the Mary Dalphine listed as wife of David Tate Moniac by other researcher's

iii.LEVITA MONIAC, b. 1802, Creek Nation; d. 23 Nov 1858; m. WILLIAM SIZEMORE; b. Abt. 1798, Baldwin Co., AL; d. Aft. 1850.

Notes for WILLIAM SIZEMORE:
1840 Baldwin
1850 Baldwin, next to mother


10.  JOHN DAVID4 WEATHERFORD (SEHOY3, SEHOY2 MARCHAND, SEHOY1 I) was born Bet. 1780 - 1790, and died Abt. 1831.  He married MARTHA PATTY DYER, daughter of REUBEN DYER and MARIA CUPINS.  She was born Abt. 1795, and died Bef. 1850.

Notes for JOHN DAVID WEATHERFORD:
tax list 1816 <Monroe County
1830 Monroe co Al, one son 5-10, male 40-50, 1 female under 5, 2 5-10 and wife 20-30 , lives next to George Stiggins

1840 find an Edward Weatherford...???
according to his brother's will, he outlived his brothe

According to one online genealogy he had Rosannah as a daughter, and this is the one married to Isaac Daniels
Marion Elijah Tarvins account..
John Weatherford married Patty Dyer, sister of David Tate's second wife, they had two children: John D. and Caroline. Caroline married Killiam and had several children. Edward was a physician who died at Muskogee, I.T., and left one child, a daughter Lita, now living with the family of Geo. W. Tarvin of Okmulgee, I. T. Norville married a man by the name of Norman, In Monroe Co. Ala. and moved to the Creek Nation in 1867.



Notes for MARTHA PATTY DYER:
Patty and Margaret Dyer are older in Carol Middleton's website, but I know the ages  of his wife

Patty Dyer's age should be, if she's still alive in 1830 20-30, which puts her born 1800-1810, he has a son born 1820-1825, and two daughters also born that time frame, and one born 1825-1830....that would make Patty born closer to 1800..

Is this the "Martha Weatherford" who married in the court case of Mary Dyer's heirs... married to Peyton Downey 1/16/1837 in Monroe county

Children of JOHN WEATHERFORD and MARTHA DYER are:
i.JOHN DYER5 WEATHERFORD, b. Abt. 1829, Monroe Co, AL; d. Aft. 1880; m. ELIZABETH TURNSTALL, 12 Jan 1848, Baldwin County, AL; b. Abt. 1833, Alabama?; d. Aft. 1880.

Notes for JOHN DYER WEATHERFORD:
1850 Monroe Co, AL
1860 MOnroe
1870 Monroe, Mariah L Weatherford, age 33 who'e in household
1880 Mount Pleasant, Monroe, Marie Waller age 50 sister in law

according to online genealogy married Elizabeth E. Waller 6/9/1864 and she is mother of last two children

ii.CAROLINE MATILDA WEATHERFORD, b. 03 Nov 1817; d. 17 Mar 1910, Escambia Co, FL; m. ESAU HENRY KILLIAM, 18 Jul 1833; b. 11 May 1811; d. Unknown.


11.  WILLAIM4 WEATHERFORD (SEHOY3, SEHOY2 MARCHAND, SEHOY1 I) was born 1781 in Alabama, and died 24 Mar 1824.  He married (1) MARY MONIAC Abt. 1793, daughter of WILLIAM MONIAC and POLLY COLBERT.  She was born Abt. 1774, and died Jan 1804 in Point Thloly, Lowndes County, Alabama.  He married (2) SOPATHE THLANIE MONIAC Abt. 1813, daughter of JOHN MONIAC and MARY TYNER.  She was born Abt. 1795, and died 1813.  He married (3) MARY STIGGINS Abt. 1817, daughter of JOSEPH STIGGINS and NANCY GRAY.  She was born Abt. 1783, and died 1832.

Notes for WILLAIM WEATHERFORD:
? whose daughter's...born ca 1810..
Rosanna M. Weatherford, married 7/9/1836 Monroe to Isaac N. Daniel
Permelia Weatherford, married 5/21/1836 to James Couch

war name: Hopnicafutsahia  "staright talker or truth teller"
best known as: lamochattee or red eagle

Marion Elisha Tarvin's account..
Wm. Weatherford the warrior and Chief, married for his first wife, Polly Moniac, daughter of Wm. Moniac and Polly Colbert; by this marriage he had three children: Charles, William and Polly. After Polly's death he married his cousin Kanoth-Koney, daughter of John Moniac. After her death he married Mary Stiggins, by whom he had five children. Alex. McGillivray Weatherford is the only one of his five children, by his third wife, who is now living, Levitia grew to womanhood and married Dr. Howell; she died and left four children. Weatherford's eldest son, Charles, by his first wife, is still living in the lower part of Monroe Co., Ala. He is now ninety-three years of age. He has a son Charles who married Martha Stoples and has eight children: Sherman, Sidney, Maggie, Loura, Mary, Charles and lone. I have often conversed with this noble and venerable old kinsman. He is a handsome old man with long white flowing beard. I have often heard him tell of the McGillivray family and the war of 1813 and 1814, carried on by Weatherford, of which the family were unhappily divided. His native land was being encroached upon by the whites on all sides; this was the stake to be fought for. He had another reason for fighting against the Americans which was that he would have been charged with cowardice, which he could not brook. Unlike his brother David Tate, he had no education. Col. Hawkins, the Indian Agent who lived long amongst the Creeks said a more truthful man than Weatherford never lived. It seemed as if nature had set her seal upon him in fashioning his form, for it was said you could not look upon him without being impressed with the idea that you were in the presence of no ordinary man. He was as perfect in form as nature ever made a man. As you see, he was of Indian, French, Scotch and English blood. Educated people who conversed with him were surprised to hear with what force and elegance he spoke the English language. He carried on the war from June 1813 to Dec.1814, when he surrendered to Gen. Andrew Jackson at Ft. Jackson, Ala., an account of which is here given in his own words as related to me by William Sizemore, Chas. Weatherford, Col. Robt. James of Clarke County, and Wm. Hollinger.


Notes for MARY STIGGINS:
1830 Baldwin Co, AL no whites listed, 13 slaves
??? Mary Weatherford Monroe Co, one male 20-30, no females, several slaves and free persons of color, are the free persons supposed to be the indians?
5 males under 10, one female unde r10,  one 24-36, and one 36-55

We estimate Mary's age to be about 47, son Alex was about 10, and her other children could be as well...William's son William should be about 17, and son Charles about 26, he may be the "white"

Children of WILLAIM WEATHERFORD and MARY MONIAC are:
i.MARY5 WEATHERFORD, b. Aft. 1793, Creek Nation; d. Bef. 1810.

Notes for MARY WEATHERFORD:
died as child

ii.CHARLES WEATHERFORD, b. Bet. 1795 - 1804, Creek Nation; d. 13 Jun 1894; m. ELIZABETH ANN STIGGINS; b. Abt. 1812, Creek Nation; d. Aft. 1880.

Notes for CHARLES WEATHERFORD:
listed as Colored in 1850 Monroe, age is 46 wife Betsy, afe 44, son William age 21, also found a Charles living with Margaret Dyer's daughter, Margaret Powell Staples, age 18, listed as colored

1840 Baldwin, blank in white section
1840 Monroe, one male 30-40, 3 males 20-30 (likely his brother's), 2 males 5-10 (his sons), one female under 5, one 15-20 (? his sister), one 20-30 (his wife_

?lAlec Sizemore, age 22 in 1860 in Monroe
1870 Monroe, wife, and Charles and his family, listed as indian


Child of WILLAIM WEATHERFORD and SOPATHE MONIAC is:
iii.WILLIAM5 WEATHERFORD, b. 25 Dec 1813; d. Unknown.


Children of WILLAIM WEATHERFORD and MARY STIGGINS are:
iv.JOHN5 WEATHERFORD, b. Bet. 1820 - 1825, Monroe Co, AL; d. Bef. 1830.

Notes for JOHN WEATHERFORD:
died as child

v.MAJOR WEATHERFORD, b. Bet. 1820 - 1825, Monroe Co, AL; d. Unknown.

Notes for MAJOR WEATHERFORD:
died as child

vi.MARY LEVITIA WEATHERFORD, b. Bet. 1820 - 1825, Monroe Co, AL; d. Unknown.
vii.ALEXANDER MCGILLIVRAY WEATHERFORD, b. Abt. 1820, Monroe Co, AL; d. Aft. 1860; m. (1) ELIZA UNKNOWN, Baldwin County, AL; b. Abt. 1825; d. Unknown; m. (2) MARTHA ELIZA POLLARD, 14 Mar 1860, Baldwin County, AL; b. Abt. 1820; d. Unknown.

Notes for ALEXANDER MCGILLIVRAY WEATHERFORD:
1850 census, wife is Eliza, marries 1860 Martha Eliza Avery
1860 census, Baldwin
1870, listed as indian, in Escambia, refused to give information on 4 boys


12.  ALEXANDER4 WEATHERFORD (SEHOY3, SEHOY2 MARCHAND, SEHOY1 I) was born Abt. 1798, and died Unknown.  He married MARY ELIZA POLLARD.  She was born Abt. 1820, and died Unknown.

Notes for ALEXANDER WEATHERFORD:
not found in 1850, unclear of source

Child of ALEXANDER WEATHERFORD and MARY POLLARD is:
i.MARY ELLEN5 WEATHERFORD, b. 1843; d. Unknown; m. ALEXANDER MONIAC SIZEMORE, 18 Aug 1862, Baldwin County, AL; b. Abt. 1839, Baldwin Co., AL; d. Unknown.

Notes for MARY ELLEN WEATHERFORD:
? where is she in 1850

Notes for ALEXANDER MONIAC SIZEMORE:
? living with charles weatherford in 1860
1870 living in Escambia, canoe


13.  ROSANNAH4 WEATHERFORD (SEHOY3, SEHOY2 MARCHAND, SEHOY1 I) was born Abt. 1805, and died Aft. 1850.  She married JOSEPH SHOMO.  He was born Abt. 1790 in Pennsylvania, and died Aft. 1850.

Notes for ROSANNAH WEATHERFORD:
Rosannah was given slaves by her brother, and it names her husband and son in the lawsuit, age from census...but way too late to be feasible if Sehoy was born ca 1740

Notes for JOSEPH SHOMO:
1850 Pensacola Florida

Children of ROSANNAH WEATHERFORD and JOSEPH SHOMO are:
i.DAVID T.5 SHOMO, b. Abt. 1826, Alabama; d. Aft. 1850.
ii.JOSEPH W. SHOMO, b. Abt. 1827, Alabama; d. Aft. 1850.
iii.JAMES I SHOMO, b. Abt. 1830, Alabama; d. Aft. 1850.
iv.VIRGINIA R. E. SHOMO, b. Abt. 1837, Alabama; d. Aft. 1850.
v.WILLIAM E SHOMO, b. 1842, Alabama; d. Aft. 1850.
vi.FRANCES P SHOMO, b. Abt. 1848, Alabama; d. Aft. 1850.


14.  LACHLAN4 DURANT (SOPHIA3 MCGILLIVRAY, SEHOY2 MARCHAND, SEHOY1 I) was born Abt. 1765 in Little Tallassie, Creek Indian Nation (now Alabama), and died Abt. 1853 in bur. Bromley Community near Bay Minette, AL..  He married MARY HALL Unknown in Creek Indian Nation in Alabama Area.  She was born 24 Nov 1784 in Baldwin Co, Al, and died Unknown in ?.

Notes for LACHLAN DURANT:
1830 census, Baldwin County, Alabama
1850 Baldwin Co, alone


Lachlan Durant's many conversations with James Allen Pickett provided the infor-
mation about the Creeks for Pickett's book  THE HISTORY OF ALABAMA.  In 1790
Col. Alexander McGuillivray was the secret agent sent out by Washington from New
York to the Creek nation.  McGuillivray with his nephews David Tate and Lachlan
Durant, and others, went to NY to negotiate with Washington.
He lived In Macon County, Alabama.
As you will see from the footnotes, some of this research was done by relatives.  I know some of these people really well, others hardly at all.  Always glad to find a new cousin.

Lachlan Durant, born probably about 1759 in Charleston, SC. See his page and also see the index to his line. Married Mary "Polly" Hall of Baldwin Co., AL. Their children are: Jack Durant (b. 1811; m. Sarah McNeill; lived at Bartlett, Williamson Co., TX), Charles Durant (b. about 1812; unmarried; was a soldier in the Mexican War, under Gen. Taylor), Martin Durant (b. about 1814; was twice sheriff of Baldwin Co., AL; m. Hannah Pollard), William Durant (b. about 1816; unmarried; was engaged by the U. S. Government, with Ex-chief Ward Coachman, in carrying the last body of 65 Creeks from Alabama to the Nation in 1849), Constantine Durant (b. about 1818), Sarah Durant (b. about 1820; m. Sam Adams), Aulilia Durant (m. J.? Knox). It is many conversations with Lachlan that provide much material on the Creeks for James Albert Pickett's The History of Alabama. Lachlan lived out his days in Monroe Co., and Baldwin Co., AL

Notes for MARY HALL:
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Mary Hall was the second child of Charles Hall and Aurelia Dupre.

Children of LACHLAN DURANT and MARY HALL are:
i.SARAH A.5 DURANT, b. Bet. 1809 - 1810, Creek Indian Nation, AL; d. Unknown; m. SAMUEL C. ADAMS, 07 Apr 1835, Macon Co., AL; b. Abt. 1820; d. Unknown.

Notes for SAMUEL C. ADAMS:
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Info on Sam comes from Sylvia Munoz. He ran a line of Stage Coaches through the Creek Nation.

ii.MARTIN MADISON DURANT, b. 1810, Creek Indian Nation, AL; d. 1880, Baldwin Co., AL; m. HANNAH BETTIE POLLARD, 18 May 1842, Baldwin Co., AL; b. Abt. 1827, ?; d. Unknown.

Notes for MARTIN MADISON DURANT:
He was twice sheriff of Baldwin County, Alabama.
1850 Baldwin co

iii.ANDREW JACKSON DURANT, b. 14 Mar 1811, Hickory Ground, Creek Indian Nation, Alabama; d. 29 Mar 1909, Bartlett, Williamson County, Texas; m. SARAH JANE MCNEILL, 05 Jun 1840, Macon County, Alabama; b. 05 Nov 1822, Georgia; d. 05 Sep 1898, Bartlett, Williamson, Texas.

Notes for ANDREW JACKSON DURANT:
Andrew was a farmer and stockman. Born in Alabama, he married Sarah J. McNeil in 1840.  In 1846 he and Sarah moved to Mississippi where they lived for a year. They then moved to Louisiana and in 1855 settled in Donahoe County, Texas. Later they finally settled on 1600 acres on Donahoe Creek in Williamson County, Texas. In 1864 he entered the Confederate Army and served principally on Galveston Island under Col. Samuel and Capt. Berry. Andrew was a Democrat and the family were members of the Methodist Church.
Info found on WFT CD #30 in Pedigree #81.

iv.AURILLIA DURANT, b. Abt. 1814, Creek Indian Nation, Alabama; d. Unknown; m. JOSEPH N. KNOX, 13 Mar 1842, Macon County, Alabama; b. Abt. 1820; d. Unknown.
v.CONSENTINE P. DURANT, b. Abt. 1818, Creek Indian Nation, Alabama; d. Unknown.

Notes for CONSENTINE P. DURANT:
He never married.  He owned land in Baldwin Co., AL.

vi.WILLIAM H. DURANT, b. 1825, Creek Indian Nation, AL; d. Aft. 1849.

Notes for WILLIAM H. DURANT:
1850 Division 2, Baldwin Co (rest of family in Div 1)

He never married. He was engaged by the U.S. Government, along with Ward Coachman, in removing the last of 65 Creeks from Alabama to the new Creek Nation in Oklahoma in 1849.


vii.CHARLES LACHLAN DURANT, b. 1828, AL; d. Aft. 1850.

Notes for CHARLES LACHLAN DURANT:
He was a soldier in the Mexican War under Gen. Taylor. He was unmarried., living with Alexander Weatherford in 1850 Baldwin



15.  SOPHIA4 DURANT (SOPHIA3 MCGILLIVRAY, SEHOY2 MARCHAND, SEHOY1 I) was born Abt. 1767, and died Aft. 1831.  She married (1) JOHN L. MCCOMB, DR. in Creek Nation, AL.  He was born Abt. 1780 in Possibly Abbeville County, South Carolina, and died Abt. 1842 in Tallapoosa County, Alabama.  She married (2) UNKNOWN LINDER Bef. 1801.  He was born Abt. 1780, and died Bef. 1815.

Notes for SOPHIA DURANT:
There were other children but their names are unknown.

Sophia Durant, born about 1761 in Little Tallassee, Elmore, AL. Married 1st- Dr. John McCombes about 1801 in Alabama. Dr. McCombes was born about 1779, Scotland. Married 2nd-? Linder.

Notes for JOHN L. MCCOMB, DR.:
John and Sophia had other children whose names are unknown. In some of the records of Tallapoosa County, Alabama, John L. McComb is listed as a Doctor. I have never been able to confirm this.

John was listed in one census as being born in Sourh Carolina. I have never been able to determine which county. There were a number of McComb's in Abbeville County, South Carolina, and it is possible that John L. may decsend from one of them.

Children of SOPHIA DURANT and JOHN MCCOMB are:
i.MALINDA D.5 MCCOMB, b. Abt. 1813, Creek Nation, AL; d. Bef. Jul 1838, Coosa (Now Elmore) County, Alabama; m. WILLIAM JASPER MASTIN, 06 Jun 1836, Tallapossa County, Alabama; b. Abt. 1811, Greenville Co, SC; d. Feb 1899, Wetumpka, Elmore, Alabama.

Notes for WILLIAM JASPER MASTIN:
William Jasper Mastin was born 1811 in Greenville County, South Carolina,
and died Feb 1899 in Wetumpka, Elmore, Alabama. He married (1) Malinda D. McComb 6 June 1836 and (2) Mary Sophia McComb 21 July 1838 in Tallapoosa County, Alabama, both being the daughters of John L. and Sophia (Durant)McComb. William J. was a man of some means owning much land in Elmore County. In the History of Elmore County he is mentioned as a Planter andalso took great interest in the Civic affairs of Wetumpka.In the 1880 Census Report he is listed as an Engineer. Two of William J.'s sons served in the Confederate Army, John who was captured at Gettsburg and died in the Ft. Delaware Prison, and Oregon who was in the 53rd Alabama
Cavalry, serving under his cousin Peter Blackwell Mastin, Jr.who was the
Company Commander of "G" Company.

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William Jasper Mastin was born 1811 in Greenville, SC and died Feb 1899 in
Tallapoosa Co., AL.  William was a man of some means owning much land in Elmore
Co.  In he History of Elmore Co., he is mentioned as a Planter.  He also took great
interest in civic affairs of Wetumpka.  In the 1880 Census Report he is listed as an
Engineer.  Two of William's sons served in the Confederate Army - John who was
captured at Gettysburg died in the Ft. Delaware prison.  Oregon was in the 53rd
Alabama Cavalry, served under his cousin Peter Blackwell Mastin, Jr. who was the
company commander of "G" Company.

ii.MARY SOPHIA MCCOMB, b. Abt. 1815, AL; d. Bef. 1898; m. WILLIAM JASPER MASTIN, 21 Jul 1838, Tallapoosa Co, AL; b. Abt. 1811, Greenville Co, SC; d. Feb 1899, Wetumpka, Elmore, Alabama.

Notes for WILLIAM JASPER MASTIN:
William Jasper Mastin was born 1811 in Greenville County, South Carolina,
and died Feb 1899 in Wetumpka, Elmore, Alabama. He married (1) Malinda D. McComb 6 June 1836 and (2) Mary Sophia McComb 21 July 1838 in Tallapoosa County, Alabama, both being the daughters of John L. and Sophia (Durant)McComb. William J. was a man of some means owning much land in Elmore County. In the History of Elmore County he is mentioned as a Planter andalso took great interest in the Civic affairs of Wetumpka.In the 1880 Census Report he is listed as an Engineer. Two of William J.'s sons served in the Confederate Army, John who was captured at Gettsburg and died in the Ft. Delaware Prison, and Oregon who was in the 53rd Alabama
Cavalry, serving under his cousin Peter Blackwell Mastin, Jr.who was the
Company Commander of "G" Company.

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William Jasper Mastin was born 1811 in Greenville, SC and died Feb 1899 in
Tallapoosa Co., AL.  William was a man of some means owning much land in Elmore
Co.  In he History of Elmore Co., he is mentioned as a Planter.  He also took great
interest in civic affairs of Wetumpka.  In the 1880 Census Report he is listed as an
Engineer.  Two of William's sons served in the Confederate Army - John who was
captured at Gettysburg died in the Ft. Delaware prison.  Oregon was in the 53rd
Alabama Cavalry, served under his cousin Peter Blackwell Mastin, Jr. who was the
company commander of "G" Company.

iii.ANGELINE MCCOMB, b. Abt. 1830, Creek Indian Nation (Now Tallapoosa Co, Alabama); d. Sep 1891, Near Wetumka, Okla. , Creek  Indian Territory.

Notes for ANGELINE MCCOMB:
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In one Census record, Angeline is listed as a teacher.
She is interred in the "Old" Wetumpka Cemetery located about 1/2 mile due north
of the Levering Creek Indian Mission in the Mission bottom.[Durant.FTW]

In one of the Census records of Alabama , Angeline is listed as a Teacher.

She is buried in the "Old" Wetumka Cemetary located about 1/2 mile due north of the Levering Creek Indian Mission  in the Mission Bottom.

iv.CORNELIA MCCOMB, b. Abt. 1831, Creek Indian Nation (Now Tallapoosa Co, Alabama); d. 23 Feb 1893, near Wetumpka, OK Creek Indian Territory.

Notes for CORNELIA MCCOMB:
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She is interred in the "Old" Wetumpka Cemetery.
She was an employee of the Levering Mission School - hired as a cook and paid
$20.00 per month.  This was found in a document signed by Israel E. Gore, Supt,,
dated 25 Sep 1884.[Durant.FTW]

She is buried in the "Old" Wetumka Cemetary located about 1/2 mile due north of the Levering Creek Indian Mission School in the Mission Bottom.

Cornelia is shown on a report of the employees of the Levering Mission School
employed as a cook paid $20.00 a month. This document was signed by Israel
G. Gore, supt., dated November 15, 1884.


16.  ELIZABETH4 DURANT (SOPHIA3 MCGILLIVRAY, SEHOY2 MARCHAND, SEHOY1 I) was born Abt. 1770 in Creek Indian Nation, AL, and died Bef. Feb 1835 in Macon Co., AL.  She married (1) PETER MCQUEEN Abt. 1790, son of JAMES MCQUEEN and KATHERINE FRASER.  He was born Abt. 1770 in AL, and died Aft. 1818 in Island off FL.  She married (2) WILLIAM MCQUEEN Abt. 1823 in Creek Nation, AL, son of UNKNOWN MCQUEEN.  He was born Abt. 1800 in Creek Indian Nation in Alabama, and died Unknown.

Notes for ELIZABETH DURANT:
Elizabeth "Betsy" Durant, born about 1765. Twin of Rachel. Married Peter McQueen. See his page. Their children were: James McQueen (b. about 1790), Millie McQueen (b. about 1792; m. Checartha Yargee, son of "Big Warrior; their daughter was: Muscogee Yargee (m. Joshua Ross; went to OK; their children - Louise Ross and Josua Ross), Nancy McQueen (b. about 1794; m. Checartha Yargee, son of Big Warrior; went to OK), Tallassee McQueen (m. Checartha Yargee, son of Big Warrior; went to OK). Married 2nd-Willy McQueen. Their children were: Sophia McQueen, Muscogee McQueen (b. about 1842).
Millie McQueen's children and grandchildren with roll numbers and census card numbers in the "Final Rolls of Citizens and Freedmen: are listed:

1400 Ross, Muscogee 52 F Fullblood, Census Card #427
1401 Ross, Susie l-2 (All are listed on Census Card 427
1402 Ross, Irwin 22 1-2 (halfblood - all Millie's children are listed as halfblood)
1403 Ross, Johnny 20
1404 Ross, Jenny P 13
1405 Ross, Frank Leslie (days old)


Notes for PETER MCQUEEN:
After the Creek War Peter joined other members of the Red Sticks and disdappeared into the Seminole Indian Country in Florida to seek help from the British.

Notes for WILLIAM MCQUEEN:
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Info on William McQueen was found on WFT CD Vol#5, in Pedigree #3729

Children of ELIZABETH DURANT and PETER MCQUEEN are:
i.JAMES5 MCQUEEN, b. Abt. 1790; d. Unknown.

Notes for JAMES MCQUEEN:
From Woodrow Wallace: James McQueen, son of Betsy Durant deceased applied in Macon County Ala., 20 Feb. 1835 to be administrator of Betsy's estate. Orphans Court Records, Macon County AL Book 1, 1834-1838, page 23.

ii.NANCY MCQUEEN, b. Abt. 1792; d. Unknown; m. CHECARTHA YARGEE, Unknown; b. Abt. 1794; d. Unknown.

Notes for CHECARTHA YARGEE:
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He was a very wealthy man with many slaves and cattle. He married all three of the McQueen sisters. This was an accepted custom among the Creeks if the present wife was agreeable. He belonged to the Wind Clan of the Creeks and lived in Hickory Ground Town in the Creek Nation in Alabama. He came to the Oklahoma Creek Indian Nation in 1838, settling on the Canadian River near old North Fork Town.

iii.MILLIE MCQUEEN, b. Abt. 1794, Creek Indian Nation in Alabama; d. Aft. 1865, Creek Indian Nation   (now Oklahoma); m. CHECARTHA YARGEE, Abt. 1835; b. Abt. 1794; d. Unknown.

Notes for MILLIE MCQUEEN:
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Millie was half blood Creek Indian.

Notes for CHECARTHA YARGEE:
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[Durant.FTW]

He was a very wealthy man with many slaves and cattle. He married all three of the McQueen sisters. This was an accepted custom among the Creeks if the present wife was agreeable. He belonged to the Wind Clan of the Creeks and lived in Hickory Ground Town in the Creek Nation in Alabama. He came to the Oklahoma Creek Indian Nation in 1838, settling on the Canadian River near old North Fork Town.

iv.TALLASSIE MCQUEEN, b. Abt. 1796; d. Unknown; m. CHECARTHA YARGEE, Unknown; b. Abt. 1794; d. Unknown.

Notes for CHECARTHA YARGEE:
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[Durant.FTW]

He was a very wealthy man with many slaves and cattle. He married all three of the McQueen sisters. This was an accepted custom among the Creeks if the present wife was agreeable. He belonged to the Wind Clan of the Creeks and lived in Hickory Ground Town in the Creek Nation in Alabama. He came to the Oklahoma Creek Indian Nation in 1838, settling on the Canadian River near old North Fork Town.


Children of ELIZABETH DURANT and WILLIAM MCQUEEN are:
v.SOPHIA5 MCQUEEN, b. Abt. 1824; d. Unknown; Stepchild; m. JOHN BRADY, 28 Jul 1842, Macon County, Alabama; b. Abt. 1824; d. Unknown.
vi.MUSCOGEE MCQUEEN, b. Abt. 1826; d. Unknown; Stepchild; m. UNKNOWN HARRISON; b. Bef. 1830; d. Unknown.


17.  RACHEL4 DURANT (SOPHIA3 MCGILLIVRAY, SEHOY2 MARCHAND, SEHOY1 I) was born Abt. 1770 in Durants Bend, Creek Indian Nation in Alabama, and died Aft. 1835 in Alabama.  She married (1) SAMUEL BRASHEARS IV Abt. 1788.  He was born Abt. 1755 in Georgia, and died Abt. 1850 in Louisiana.  She married (2) WILLIAM MCGIRT Abt. 1790.  He was born Abt. 1770, and died Unknown.  She married (3) DAVID WALKER, SR. Abt. 1800 in Choctaw Nation, MS.  He was born Abt. 1780 in Creek Indian Nation (Present day Alabama), and died Bet. 1821 - 1824.  She married (4) ZADOC BRASHEARS II 1824 in Marengo Co., AL.  He was born Abt. 1754 in North Carolina, and died Bef. 11 Nov 1834 in West Florida.

Notes for RACHEL DURANT:
Rachel Durant, born about 1765. Twin of Betsy. Married 1st- Samuel Brashears ca 1786 (their children were: Alexander Brashears, (b. 1790 LA, d. 4/20/1848; Samuel Brashears, Jr. born ca 1782). Married on 8/8/1803 in Columbia Co., GA (recorded) to 2nd-David Walker, Sr. Their children were: Martha Walker (b. ca 1806 GA, married 1st- William LeFlore; m. 2nd- David Walker, born 1808, died 11/1859, Simpson Co., MS). Married maybe 1st-Billy McGirth (unproven). Married 3rd-Zadock Brashears, Sr. who was Samuel's brother, on 7/30/1824, Marengo Co., AL.

Rachel was born to Sophia McGuillivray Durant at Durant's Bend on the Alabama
River about 1770.  While her father supported Alexander McGuillivray, her uncle, in
his war and politics to protect the Creek lands, Sophie, Rachel's mother, engaged in
the cattle business.  Sophia's business in Mobile and particularly in Pensacola occu-
pied much of her time.  Financed by the Panton and Leslie trading Cor. in Pensacola,
she became prominent in her own right.  As McGuillivray's sister, she served him not
not only as interpreter in his dealings with the Indians in Indian country, but also as
his representative in Pensacola.  In this capacity, she was welcomed by the Spanish
governor after Spain occupied Pensacola in 1780 as O'Neil's guest
When Rachel was about 46 years of age, she was located in the vicinity of Little River,
the border between Monroe and Baldwin Counties in AL.  Fisher's post office was
located nearby.  At that time, she and her children and relatives wrote a lengthy
letter to Pres. Madison, dated May 29, 1815 and mailed it at Fisher's post office.  This
letter and Hawkin's investigation of the individuals involved has been valuable in
establishing the legitimacy of the Poarch Creeks as a Creek  tribe.  The letter was
signed by Rachel Walker, Lachlan Durant, Samuel Brashiers, William McGirt, Sophia
McComb, Peggy Summerlin, Nancy Summerlin, Leonard McGhee, Lemi (or Semi)
McGhee, Alex Brashiers, and Harriet Linder.  The letter gives insight into the condi-
tions around Little River at the time.

This info on Rachel was found in WFT C.D. #3 in Pedigree #5553 submitte by Lt. Col. Woodrow W. Wallace.

The info I found in Okla research show that Rachel was married to a James Bailey who was killed at Ft. Mims and that they had a son named Lachlan whose date of birth is unknown, per Charles Brashears book, this is her sister Nancy.


Notes for ZADOC BRASHEARS II:
Much of my information comes from the information supplied by Charles Brashears, author of the Brashear family genealogies as posted online. I have found records of the marriages, and information along the way, but I am not actively "researching" this line, so I am not looking for solid proof of all information.

Children of RACHEL DURANT and SAMUEL BRASHEARS are:
i.ALEXANDER5 BRASHEARS I, b. Abt. 1789, Pensacola, FL; d. 06 Apr 1868, Sumter Co., AL; m. Abt. 1810; m. (2) ANN BRASHEARS IV, Abt. 1815; b. Abt. 1793, Choctaw Nation, MS; d. Abt. 1825, Choctaw Nation, MS; m. (3) EMILINE JANE WINN, 15 Jul 1826; b. Abt. 1806; d. 10 Jan 1841; m. (4) BROMLEY CAVEY, 24 Sep 1843; b. Abt. 1819; d. Unknown.

Notes for ALEXANDER BRASHEARS I:
Two different dates for death, possibly because the name is so familiar, so unsure of date.

Alexander was Ann's Cousin and he was a beneficiary under Clause 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, 1830.  Alexander got 640 acres as a resident of more than five years, and nine quarter sections, one for each of his children.

1840 sumter County, Alabama
Alexander Brashears 40 to 50, 2 males under 5, 1 5-10, 1 10-15, 1 15-10, one female under 5, one 5-10, 2 10-15, one 20-30
Below him is his son Alex. M. Brashears, male 20-30, female under 5 and female 20-30
4 households below that is Delilah Brashears males 5-10 one, 20 to 30 one, 2 females under 5, 2 5-10, 2 10-15, one female 20-30, one 30-40 then slaves
below her is Ann Brashears, males 2 5-10, 1 15-20, 1 20-30, females one under 5, one 30-40
below her is A. Buckholtz, one male 20-30, females, 1 under 5, one 5-10, one 10-15, and one 15-20
Charles Moran is on the next page one male under 5, one male 20-30, female 5-10 and female 15-20

sumter county deeds
http://www.rootsweb.com/%7Ealsumter/tax-land/bookb/deedsbl.htm
http://www.rootsweb.com/%7Ealsumter/tax-land/bookb/deedsbs.htm
1850  Mobile
Alexander, wife Bromley, 31 Dennis, 21, Emeline 17, Retares 5,

Notes for ANN BRASHEARS IV:
This could also be Anne Dicostro Brashears
http://www.rootsweb.com/%7Ealsumter/tax-land/booke/deedsefg.htm

ii.SAMUEL BRASHEARS V, b. Jun 1792; d. Bet. 1840 - 1850.

Notes for SAMUEL BRASHEARS V:
Children living with Thomas Lanier, and Susan Brashears Lanier in 1850 census, Sumter Co. Al?
Those are the names included in this gedcom

Land records 510.4 acres, Indian land allotment west of Alabama River 5n 4e s2 (1820)
1825 St. Stephens, e1/2nw 6n,4e, s 35 79.25 acres
BRASHIERS     SAMUEL            2         5N         4E     ST STEPHENS   510.4        1820/04/12   WEST OF ALABAMA RIVER
BRASHIERS     SAMUEL            35        6N         4E     ST STEPHENS   79.25        1825/04/20

1816 Territorial tax list, Monroe Co.
1830 Clarke Co. AL
One male 30-40, one male 15-20 (1815-1820), one male under 5 (James?), one female 20-30, one 5-10 (?) and one under 5 (?)
1840 Clarke Co. AL
one male 40-50, one male under 5 (born 1835-1840)(Jesse?), one male 10-15 (born 1825-1830 (?James)), one female 30-40, one 15-20 (born 1820-1825 (???)), one 10-15 (1825-1830), 2 females 5-10 (1830-1835)(? Amanda and Martha), one female under 5 (1835-1840) (Malissa?)

1850 Green Co. AR there is a 30 year old Samuel Brashears born in ALabama, Relative?

1841 Clarke Co. AL, Nancy Brashears married James C. Worley, is this his daughter, James C. Worley, born 1820 and Nancy A. Worley born 1819 or 1820 in Choctaw Co. AL in 1850, they disappear in 1860



iii.RACHEL BRASHEARS, b. Abt. 1794; d. Unknown; m. GEORGE H. CHRISMAN, 12 Mar 1822; b. Abt. 1780; d. Unknown.


Child of RACHEL DURANT and WILLIAM MCGIRT is:
iv.WILLIAM5 MCGIRT, JR., b. Abt. 1795, Creek Indian Nation in Alabama; d. Unknown.


Children of RACHEL DURANT and DAVID WALKER are:
v.GEORGE W.5 WALKER, SR., b. Abt. 1800; d. Bef. 1856; m. REBECCA JUZAN, 19 Jan 1832, Sumter  Co, Alabama; b. 1804; d. 04 May 1854, Atoka co. IT.

Notes for GEORGE W. WALKER, SR.:
1885 San bois, possible son...
188. Walker, George W., 39, M/I, Physician, 80 ac.
189. Walker, Sarah, 22, F/I, ,
190. Walker, William, 8, M/I, ,
191. Walker, Cora, 4, F/I, ,
192. Walker, Arthur, 3, M/I, ,

A George Walker is listed with T.J. Bonds in 1855, along with a William
? found a George Walker in 1840, Sumter Co. AL, Male 30-40, female 30-40, with children one male 20-30, one male 10-15, 2 males 5-10, and one under 5


vi.SARAH WALKER, b. Abt. 1800; d. Abt. 1826; m. J. H. MILLER, 19 Mar 1820, Marengo County, Alabama; b. Abt. 1800; d. Unknown.
vii.SOPHIA WALKER, b. Abt. 1804; d. Unknown; m. DENNIS PAYNE, Abt. 1830; b. Abt. 1795; d. Unknown.
viii.MARTHA WALKER, b. Abt. 1806, Creek Indian Nation, Alabama; d. Bet. 1850 - 1860; m. (1) WILLIAM LEFLORE, 23 Mar 1824, Marengo County, Alabama; b. 1806, LeFleur's Bluff, Pearl River, Choctaw Territory; d. Aug 1844, Bok Iskitni, Carroll Co., MS; m. (2) STEPHEN TERRY, 21 Mar 1850, Carroll County, MIssissippi; b. 1798, Virginia; d. Aft. 1860.

Notes for MARTHA WALKER:
Info on this family was submitted by Sylvia Bailey-Munoz who is a descendant of Capt. Checartha Yargee.

1850 census, Carroll County, living with husband Stephen Perry or Terry, George is living with a cousin, all other children younger than Greenwood in household, can't find the children after 1860

Notes for WILLIAM LEFLORE:
Household on Armstrong 6, 1,2 and 6 Slaves {He had four children in 1832, none in gedcom over 10 He aand Martha were over 10, his children Isabelle, Sophia George and Greenwood make 6}

William Leflore 26, Martha 24, Isabell 7, Sophia 6, George 4, Greenwood 1 Emigration book}

1840 Carroll County, MS
male 40-50, male 10-15 {George W, 12}, male 5-10 {Greenwood, 9}, female 30-40{wife Martha}, 2 females 15-20{ Isabelle, 15 and??} , 2 females under 5 {Elizabeth 2, Susan 1}

ix.HENRIETTA WALKER, b. Abt. 1808; d. Unknown; m. W. J. HARMON; b. Abt. 1817; d. Unknown.
x.BENJAMIN WALKER, b. Abt. 1810; d. Unknown; m. (1) ISABELL JUZAN, 09 Feb 1834, Sumter Co, AL; b. Abt. 1821; d. Unknown; m. (2) SYBILL JUZAN, 09 Feb 1834, Sumter Co, AL; b. Abt. 1821; d. Unknown.

Notes for BENJAMIN WALKER:
1830 Simpson Co. MS 1300001 fe 00001 born 1780-1790 (too old.. not him)

Notes for ISABELL JUZAN:
Goes by Sybil

xi.DAVID WALKER, JR., b. Abt. 1820; d. Nov 1859, Simpson County, Mississippi; m. REBECCA BUTLER; b. Abt. 1810; d. Unknown.


18.  MARY4 DURANT (SOPHIA3 MCGILLIVRAY, SEHOY2 MARCHAND, SEHOY1 I) was born Abt. 1774, and died Abt. 1836 in Steamboat in route to indian territory.  She married TUSTENNUGGE EMARTHLA.  He was born Abt. 1770, and died Abt. 1836.

Notes for MARY DURANT:
Mary "Polly" Durant, born about 1763 in Little Tallassee, Elmore, AL. Married Mustaushobie Coohchman. Their child: Ward Coochman (was engaged by the U. S. Government, with William Durant, in carrying the last body of 65 Creeks from Alabama to the Nation in 1849; first Chief of the Creeks after the Removal

Child of MARY DURANT and TUSTENNUGGE EMARTHLA is:
i.WARD5 COOCHMAN, b. Abt. 1800; d. Unknown.


19.  MARGARET4 MCGILLIVARY (ALEXANDER3 MCGILLIVRAY, SEHOY2 MARCHAND, SEHOY1 I) was born Abt. 1782, and died Bef. 1828.  She married CHARLES CORNELLS.  He was born Abt. 1780, and died Bet. 1827 - 1828.

Child of MARGARET MCGILLIVARY and CHARLES CORNELLS is:
i.LIZZIE5 CORNELLS, b. Abt. 1802; d. Unknown.